Human Organs-on-Chips

as replacements for animal testing


Media:  Talk   

Tuesday
14 March 2017
20:00

Byens Lys
Christiania

Donald Ingber

Cell biologist and bioengineer, the Founding Director of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program Boston Children’s Hospital, and Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Inventors, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Homepage

Lydmor & Bon Homme

Lydmor & Bon Homme is the meeting of two very different personas and well-known figures in the Danish music scene. On the one hand, the eccentric Tomas Høffding, which is probably most known as the singer/bassist of the legendary disco kings WhoMadeWho, but also known as a reputable solo artist and DJ under the alter-ego, Bon Homme. On the other hand, the young singer and producer, Lydmor, a.k.a. Jenny Rossander, who has released and toured much of the world in her own name but also in collaboration with artists like Arsenal (BE), Amanda Palmer (US), Bottled in England, Black Sun, etc. Now Lydmor and Bon Homme joined forces in a new project that combines the best of their qualities as artists in a toxic cocktail of pulsating beats, catchy synth-stanzas and potent songs. Homepage

No more mice and no more human testing subjects! How great could life be?


But, can Organs-on-a-Chip actually replace human organs? And what human organ functions can Organs-on-Chips be used to model? Plus, how effective are organs-on-chips at modeling human diseases and drug responses? Further, why is there a need to replace animal testing for drug development, should we care about mice? Can Organs-on-Chips be used for specific people, as in the making of personalised medicine?


Organs-on-Chips are micro devices made out of living human cells and created with computer chip manufacturing techniques. Their applications are immense: they can be used for drug development, to investigate how organs work as well as to make personalised medicine. Donald Ingber, world leading biology engineer from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard will explain the recent advances in the engineering of multiple organ chips, including lung, intestine, kidney, and blood-brain barrier chips, as well as how they have been used to develop human disease models, co-culture living microbiome, and discover new therapeutics.


Donald Ingber will also discuss recent efforts in joining all of these organ chips and forming a complete ‘human-body-on-chips’, therefore creating an instrument that can be used to study cellular responses to pharmaceuticals, chemicals and toxins.


Afterwards, a brand new cocktail menu, specially crafted for the start of the season will be available at the bar. And while you sip these eye-opening chilled drinks and think about your liver and lungs on a smooth and nice electronic chip, Lydmor & Bon Homme join forces in a new project that combines the best of their qualities as artists in a toxic cocktail of pulsating beats, catchy synth-stanzas and potent songs. It will be a unique evening where we will play acoustic versions from ‘The Red Acoustic STC Session’ for the first and perhaps the last time. We will stretch out and let our acoustic and electronic worlds meet. See review in Gaffa.



Entrance to the event is free. No registration is necessary. Doors open at 19:00.







The talk: